curb-management-icon

Curb Coordination Challenge

How can we reduce traffic by improving coordination at the curb?

Record traffic in New York City cost the $20 billion annually in lost productivity and excess costs. The Transit Tech Lab seeks solutions to coordinating traffic at the curb among passenger cars, for-hire vehicles, public buses, commercial trucks, commuter vans, tour buses, bicycles and pedestrians. Potential opportunities include dynamic pricing for parking and curb zone management, real-time mapping and parking/relief stand reservations, new uses of existing real estate and last-mile freight distribution networks.

Resources

Department of Transportation (DOT)

  • DOT Parking Data
  • DOT Construction Data
  • DOT Bicycle Route Data
  • DOT Truck Data
  • NYC Planimetric Geodatabase
    ArcGIS database with many foundational features related to the curb (e.g. Curb, Pavement Edge, sidewalk, medians, etc.) and other “area” features (e.g. open space, roadbed, shoreline, etc.)
  • NYC LION
    Shapefile of street centerlines and other related information.
  • MTA Transit Stops (Bus, Rail, Subway)
    Curbside bus stops and other transit locations.
  • MTA Subway Entrances
  • ParkNYC Zones
    Shapefile of blockfaces with metered regulations. Note that the base features are entire blockfaces not segments. In other words, if only a section of a blockface has metered regulations, this dataset shows the entire blockface. “ParkNYC” is the name of DOT’s Pay-by-Cell app for city parking meters.
  • Parking Violations
    Available on NYC Open data by Fiscal Year. Once geocoded, could provide some information on different curbside-disrupting activity (e.g. double parking, illegal parking, etc.) always with the caveat that it’s a better measure of enforcement activity across the city than a measure of the activity it’s enforcing.

Taxi and Limosuine Commission

Transit Tech Lab Challenges